$10 Gold Indian Head 1907-1933

  

The Indian Head eagle was a ten-dollar gold piece, or eagle struck by the United States Mint continuously from 1907 until 1916, and then irregularly until 1933. The obverse and the reverse, designed by the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, were originally commissioned for use on other denominations. Saint-Gaudens was suffering from cancer, and did not survive to see the coins released.

Beginning in 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt proposed the introduction of new, more artistic designs on US coins, prompting the Mint to hire Saint-Gaudens to create them. Roosevelt and Saint-Gaudens at first considered a uniform design for the four denominations of US coin which were struck in gold, but in 1907 Roosevelt decided to use a model for the obverse of the eagle that the sculptor had meant to use for the cent. For the reverse of the ten-dollar coin the President decided on a design featuring a standing bald eagle, which had been developed for the twenty-dollar piece designed by Saint-Gaudens.

Coin Features:

  • Contains .4838 oz of Gold.
  • The obverse features Lady Liberty crowned with a war bonnet encircled by 13 stars with the word “Liberty” on her hair band and the date below. The reverse features a majestic bald eagle.
  • Designed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens.
  • Metal Content: 0.4838 troy oz
  • Purity: .900
  • Thickness: 2.03 mm
  • Diameter: 27 mm

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